Have you ever heard of Slow Fashion?

Did you know that all the skirts and scarves in my shop are designed and sewn by me?! I don't say that to toot my own horn, just to let you know. I have always loved sewing, and my adventure into fashion began by making skirts for myself for fun! I still love it and get a huge kick out of seeing people in my designs!

Soft flowy jersey fabric ready to turn into breezy swing skirts in my home studio!

Soft flowy jersey fabric ready to turn into breezy swing skirts in my home studio!

The reason I ask is because there's a movement afoot called Slow Fashion. Honestly, I had heard about it, but never really understood it until I researched for this post. Some of the articles I read felt very much like shaming people who engage in "fast fashion" but I decidedly didn't want to do that! I shop at Old Navy too, ain't no shame in that!

So what is it, you ask? Well this quote from Elizabeth Cline, author of Overdressed: The Shockingly High Cost of Cheap Fashion really summed it up for me:

It’s about reconnecting with our clothes, rather than viewing them as quick trends or throwaway items,” Cline said. “It’s about tapping into the pleasure of buying a well-made garment with a timeless design, being able to recognize quality, repairing and properly caring for your wardrobe.
— Elizabeth Cline, author of Overdressed: The Shockingly High Cost of Cheap Fashion

That totally resonates with me. The first skirt I made for myself that became part of my collection (my Fractured Linear Pencil Skirt) is 4 years old and survived both my pregnancies and is still kicking. It's a well-made, trans-seasonal staple for me.

Slow Fashion is also about understanding where our products come from, how they're constructed and by whom. Was it manufactured (sewn) locally, in the US or overseas? What are the conditions of the place where it was made? Sometimes even understanding where the fabric itself was made/printed and where the raw materials for that were grown and under what conditions (organic, non-GMO, recycled plastics, etc).

I've never really considered my business part of the "slow fashion" movement, but in a way it is. You know where my skirts comes from: me, made locally in NC. You know how they're constructed: by me for now on my trusty Brother sewing machine and serger. But when we expand, I fully plan to work with local manufacturers or even collectives of sewers to produce my designs. And you know the conditions of where it's made: my home studio...it's quite lovely here! Truth be told, sourcing materials is the hardest part, but whenever possible I try to understand where my fabric is made and under what conditions. It's an evolution!

My collection is also about creating versatile pieces for women that are not throwaways but can easily transition from work to play, from spring to fall. I am continually improving my construction as well to ensure that the seams and hems last as long as possible.

It's definitely a labor of love, but when you purchase one of my skirts, I really hope that it lasts a very long time and that we can be there with you through many of life's amazing moments!

Learn more about Slow Fashion from this NPR Article!